There are five levels to the 2013 Audio Book Challenge:

  • Flirting-Listen to 6 Audio Books
  • Going Steady- Listen to 12 Audio Books
  • Lover- Listen to 25 Audio Books
  • Married-Listen to more than 25 Audio Books
  • You Define the Relationship- Create your own challenge (choose your own name and level starting as low or going as high as you’d like)

I’m going to start off “FLIRTING” 🙂

Thanks to @teresasreading to hosting this challenge again 🙂

Lazing about on the futon couch and reading the romance novel, The Marriage Mistake (Marriage to a Billionaire series #3; by Jennifer Probst) – Great sex scenes (★★★★☆); but improbable premise in that wealthy and attractive people in the 21st c do not seem to realize that all sorts of things have happened on the past 60+ years that you really needn’t be held hostage to 19th c morality. Really, is there a 21st c situation in which you *have* to get married anymore? (★★★☆☆)

What’s in a Name? Challenge #6

Why, yes! Yes, I am participating in What’s in a Name? Challenge #6! “What?!” you say, “I thought you said no more blogging!” Yes, it’s true, no more blogging; but I’m going to be participating as a non-blogger in the challenge by posting comments at www.bethfishreads.com/ What’s in a Name? Challenge #6 🙂



                                           


I’ve actually spent the past couple of days pulling down the stacks and sorting out books, finding the ones that would qualify for next years challenge:

  1. A book with up or down (or equivalent) in the title: Deep down True, The Girl Below, The Diva Digs up the Dirt
  2. A book with something you’d find in your kitchen in the title: Loose Lips Sink Ships, The Knife of Never Letting Go, Breadcrumbs
  3. A book with a party or celebration in the title: A Feast for Crows, A Wedding in Haiti, Cocktail Hour under the Tree of Forgetfulness
  4. A book with fire (or equivalent) in the title: Burning for Revenge, Fireworks over Toccoa, Catching Fire
  5. A book with an emotion in the title: Baltimore Blues, Say You’re Sorry, Dreams of Joy
  6. A book with lost or found (or equivalent) in the title: The Book of Lost Fragrances, The World We Found, A Discovery of Witches
(Text captured from www.bethfishreads.com/ What’s in a Name? Challenge #6)


So, what do I have on hand that would fit?
  1. UP/DOWN: She Got Up Off the Couch (by Haven Kimmel);
  2. KITCHEN: Mr. Peanut (by Adam Ross); Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe (by Fannie Flagg); The History of the World in 6 Glasses (by Tom Standage); Fast Food Nation (by Eric Schlosser); Three Cups of Tea (by Greg Mortensen and Oliver Relin); The Cold Dish (by Craig Johnson); In Defense of Food (by Michael Pollan); Last Night at the Lobster (by Stewart O’Nan) and, to be funny The Gardner Heist (by Ulrich Boser)
  3. PARTY: Skeletons at the Feast (by Chris Bohjalian)
  4. FIRE: Chariots of Fire (by W.J. Weatherby); Burning Angel (by James Lee Burke)
  5. EMOTION: The Walking Dead, Volume 4: This Sorrowful Life (by Robert Kirkman et al); House of Mirth (by Edith Wharton)
  6. LOST/FOUND: The Lost Diaries of Franz Hals (by Michael Kernan); Lost Illusions (by Honoré de Balzac)

What’s in a Name? Challenge #5: Wrap-Up/ Challenge #6 Sign-Up


Ah, it’s time for my post-prandial wrap-up in the What’s in a Name? Challenge! So far, I’ve read for five out of the six categories; but by December 31, I expect to have completed the entirety of the challenge. This past year, the six categories were:

  • A book with something you’d find in your pocket/purse/backpack in the title: 
The Scarlet Letter (by Nathaniel Hawthorne)

I read like a mad woman over the first week-end of 2012 and posted my review on January 3 and; unbelievably, there were others who beat me not only in posting to this category; but in completing the challenge! It was a great reminder that this is not a competition! There are no prizes other than the reward of reading! So yes, I still won! 😀

Anyway, right after reading The Scarlet Letter, I promptly set to re-reading The Handmaid’s Tale (by Margaret Atwood) and Nini Holmqvist’s The Unit, and then onward to listening to When She Woke (by Hillary Jordan; narrated by Heather Corrigan.) I also went on to read more of Margaret Atwood’s works (Alias Grace and The Blind Assassin) and later in the year, The Wordy Shipmates (by Sarah Vowell.) It should also be noted that I drafted several long essays about society and morality and women and stuff and, on this Thanksgiving week-end, trust me, you should be glad that I didn’t bore you to tears by actually publishing any of it 🙂

  • A book with something you’d find on a calendar in the title:
(by Margaret Atwood; narrated by Bernadette Dunne, Katie McNichol and Mark Bramhall; featuring music and lyrics by Margaret Atwood and performed by Orville Stoeber)

More Margaret Atwood! I’m not sure, but I’m pretty sure I could have done most of this challenge just using Margaret Atwood titles (Snake PoemsThe PenelopiadMorning in the Burned House) except that I didn’t think of it until now. Also, I can’t seem to think of an Atwood title with a topographical feature in the title, so it would have blown the idea up anyway :-/


After reading Oryx and Crake, I was actually pretty mad at Margaret Atwood. In the Handmaid’s Tale, I thought the epilogue was a few too sentences too many; but with O&A, not nearly enough sentences were written. I mean, really, would it have killed her to write one more sentence at the end to give us a sense of, well, an ending? Well, she did write a sentence more. Actually she wrote The Year of the Flood and it answers all of the questions raised in O&A for which I was grateful. Maddaddam, the third novel in the series is slated to be published in 2013, and while I’m looking forward to it as an expansion of the world that Atwood created, I don’t need to read it to get a sense of closure.

  • A book with something you’d see in the sky in the title:

This review for this novella was the last review I wrote on this blog. It’s not very good; but it’s short. I point this out in the context of the next next two books for which I wrote no reviews:

  • A book with a topographical feature in the title:
Tortilla Flat
(by John Steinbeck)

I wanted to love this novella. I really did. Having been to Monterrey, CA, I loved the idea of having an actual place to connect with the setting of the book. And really, come on! John Steinbeck! Who hasn’t been moved by The Grapes of Wrath, The Red Pony and/or Of Mice and Men? Also, the jacket blurb offered something along the lines of an Arthurian tale: “Like the Knights of the Round Table, the dreamers who gather at Danny’s house share joy and fellowship, triumphs and sorrows.” Alas, the freeloaders, drunks and cheats who populate these pages have more in common with the crew hanging out at 7-11 with nothing to do than with the Romantic figures of Camelot. Seventeen chapters over two-hundred pages of post-war (WWI) vets who never quite get it together.

  • A book with something creepy/crawly in the title:
The Reptile Room
(A Series of Unfortunate Events #2, by Lemony Snicket)

The Reptile Room continues the story of the three Baudelaire orphans who wind up in the custody of Uncle Monty, a respected herpetologist. Lemony Snicket always forewarns readers that these tales do not end HEA, and yet I find myself once again surprised that this is in fact true! I think hope endures on my part because I know that these are children’s stories ergo they can’t possibly be this “angsty!” Regardless, the stories are clever and and certainly had me wondering what was going to happen next! 


So what’s up with that? Why didn’t I post the reviews for the last two books I read? And seriously, the review for From the Land of the Moon was pretty half-assed at that. Actually, if you’ve been following my blog for the past six months, you’ll notice that not much has been going on at all….

It’s time. It’s time to own up that I just don’t have it in me anymore as a blogger. Since July, a lot of things have been going on in my life, a lot of things have changed and blogging isn’t working out for me anymore. So as the crude but apt saying goes, “It’s time to shi!t or get off the pot.” On 12/01/2012, I’ll be closing the blog to comments. I’ll still be on twitter (@dogearedcopy) talking about books that I’m reading and, I’ll still be around to support other bloggers’ features as best I can. I just won’t be posting here so much if at all. It’s a sad but ultimately correct decision that I’ve taken way too long to arrive at; but now that I’ve said it, it’s terribly freeing 🙂

I love you all,
Stay Cool and Keep the Faith,
Tanya

P.S. – What about the sixth book, “A book with a type of house or domicile in the title”? I have a copy of The Kitchen House (by Kathleen Grissom) sitting here and I fully expect to have read it by the end of the calendar year and declare #wain5 completed. If you’re interested in what I think about it, follow me on twitter… 🙂

P.P.S – Why, yes! Ys, I am participating in What’s in a Name? Challenge #6! “What?!” you say, “I thought you just said no more blogging!” Yes, it’s true. I’m going to be participating as a non-blogger by posting comments at http://www.bethfishreads.com/ What’s in a Name? Challenge #6 🙂


I’ve actually spent the past couple of days pulling down the stacks and sorting out books, finding the ones that would qualify for next years challenge:

  1. A book with up or down (or equivalent) in the title: Deep down True, The Girl Below, The Diva Digs up the Dirt
  2. A book with something you’d find in your kitchen in the title: Loose Lips Sink Ships, The Knife of Never Letting Go, Breadcrumbs
  3. A book with a party or celebration in the title: A Feast for Crows, A Wedding in Haiti, Cocktail Hour under the Tree of Forgetfulness
  4. A book with fire (or equivalent) in the title: Burning for Revenge, Fireworks over Toccoa, Catching Fire
  5. A book with an emotion in the title: Baltimore Blues, Say You’re Sorry, Dreams of Joy
  6. A book with lost or found (or equivalent) in the title: The Book of Lost Fragrances, The World We Found, A Discovery of Witches


(Text captured from www.bethfishreads.com/ What’s in a Name? Challenge #6)

I’ve a couple books lined up for each category; but let’s see what 2013 actually puts in my path 🙂

From the Land of the Moon

by Milena Agus; translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein
Europa Editions, January 2011

From the Land of the Moon is a novella about a Sardinian woman searching for love in the post-war years amongst the metaphorical and literal ruins of her life. The woman recognizes that her nature is perhaps flawed as true love seems to remain elusive. Her quest assumes at times, sad, pitiable, desperate and creative forms that echo the pathos of Anna Karenina and Madam Bovary. The woman moves about the Italian landscapes of Cagliari and Milan as the country rebuilds from the effects of Allied Bombing and Nazi retreat. The settings of the story provide the physical architecture of the woman’s efforts and parallels can be drawn between the reconstruction and her state of mind. The story is told from the point of view of the woman’s granddaughter after the woman, referred to as Grandmother, has passed away, providing a doubly unreliable narrative: The woman herself may have been insane and her story suffers from being two generations away from being immediately verified. From the Land of the Moon is poignant without being maudlin and, the letter which serves as the final chapter is a powerful denouement.

***********************************************

From the Land of the Moon qualifies for the What’s in a Name? Challenge #5 hosted by @BethFishReads at http://www.BethFishReads. The title, From the Land of the Moon contains a word that is “something you’d see in the sky“: “Moon”




I borrowed a copy of From the Land of the Moon (by Milena Agus; translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein) form the Jackson County Library System in Southern Oregon. I receive no monies, goods and/or service in exchange for reviewing this product and/or mentioning any of the persons that are or may be implied in this post.

“If you can’t be with the one you love, love the one you’re with” — Stephen Stills