From the Land of the Moon

by Milena Agus; translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein
Europa Editions, January 2011

From the Land of the Moon is a novella about a Sardinian woman searching for love in the post-war years amongst the metaphorical and literal ruins of her life. The woman recognizes that her nature is perhaps flawed as true love seems to remain elusive. Her quest assumes at times, sad, pitiable, desperate and creative forms that echo the pathos of Anna Karenina and Madam Bovary. The woman moves about the Italian landscapes of Cagliari and Milan as the country rebuilds from the effects of Allied Bombing and Nazi retreat. The settings of the story provide the physical architecture of the woman’s efforts and parallels can be drawn between the reconstruction and her state of mind. The story is told from the point of view of the woman’s granddaughter after the woman, referred to as Grandmother, has passed away, providing a doubly unreliable narrative: The woman herself may have been insane and her story suffers from being two generations away from being immediately verified. From the Land of the Moon is poignant without being maudlin and, the letter which serves as the final chapter is a powerful denouement.

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From the Land of the Moon qualifies for the What’s in a Name? Challenge #5 hosted by @BethFishReads at http://www.BethFishReads. The title, From the Land of the Moon contains a word that is “something you’d see in the sky“: “Moon”




I borrowed a copy of From the Land of the Moon (by Milena Agus; translated from the Italian by Ann Goldstein) form the Jackson County Library System in Southern Oregon. I receive no monies, goods and/or service in exchange for reviewing this product and/or mentioning any of the persons that are or may be implied in this post.

“If you can’t be with the one you love, love the one you’re with” — Stephen Stills


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